Adrian Osmond | THE THREEPENNY OPERA
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ABOUT

Inspired by John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera, this anarchic masterpiece delves into the Soho underworld and the exploits of Macheath, a notorious criminal and womaniser.

CREATIVE TEAM

Director

Musical Supervisor

Movement Director

Designer

Lighting Designer

Asssistant Director

Assistant Designer 

Wardrobe Supervisor

Vocal Coach

Fight Director

Production Manager 

Stage Manager 

DSM 

ASM 

Peachum

Walt 

Betty

Tiger Brown

Mrs Peachum 

Macheath 

Jenny 

Molly

Rev Kimball 

Polly 

Constable 

Constable 

Dolly

Jake 

Coaxer 

Lucy Brown 

Filch / Bob

Smith

Matt 

Adrian Osmond

Claire McKenzie

Maïté Delafin

Jessica Brettle

Adam McCall

Kristin Davis

Jessica Lennon

Robert Leop Macfarlane

Jean Sangster

Raymond Short

Sam Ramsay

Ashleigh Riley

Sarah Wilson

Ashley Kerray

Craig Anderson

Bay Bryan

Carrie-Jane Connor

Andrew Fraser

Alana Gibb

Scott Gilmour

Zoe Halliday

Rosie Ladkin

Richard Leonard

Kirsty MacLaren

Marisa Manuel

Alison Miller

Sophie Reid

Lawrence Robb

Vikki Rogers

Claire Marie Seddon

Robert Sharpe

Dara Stewart

Julian Wejwar

DIRECTOR’S NOTES

The Threepenny Opera pulls you constantly in two different directions.  It is exuberant entertainment that is self-conscious in its theatricality.  And yet there is also real fury running through this piece.  (“For once you must try not to shirk the facts:  Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.”)

So there are times when you can be extremely playful in your complicity with the audience (our jail had no bars – Macheath could have stepped out of his cell at any point), and then there are other times when you need to strip away all pretension.  During “What Keeps Mankind Alive?”, Mrs Peachum tore off her wig, and the cast stepped forward until they were just a foot or two from the audience, challenging them directly with their eyes.

At the outset of the performance, meat hooks dangled from ropes around the stage.  During the overture, these rose out of sight.  But with the closing ballad, the meat hooks descended again as all the lights blazed.  One by one, the performers stopped playing the music, put their instruments down, and walked over to a meat hook.  Then they attached the meat hook to the scruff of their neck and, with a sigh, slumped so that their body hung from the hook, lifeless.  Each time this happened, a light would flick out.

Gradually the sound dissipated, and the stage grew darker.  The final instrument cut out when there was just one bulb still glowing… and nineteen bodies were left swaying in the silence.